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Endocrinology News and Research Articles

Advice from dietitians may help diabetics control their condition
11/24/2010 - Individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes know that maintaining a nutritious diet is one of the most important things they can do to control their disease. The findings of a new study suggest that the services of a registered dietitian may help individuals accomplish this goal.
Pressure may hinder the production of new fat
11/24/2010 - In a finding that could have major implications for reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes, researchers from Tel Aviv University in Israel have shown that mechanical loads may prevent fat cells from producing new fat in the body.
Researchers determine the best exercise for blood sugar control
11/24/2010 - Adding aerobic exercise and resistance training to a treatment plan may significantly improve blood sugar levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes, according to new research from Louisiana State University.
Facial moles may signify lower risk of osteoporosis
11/24/2010 - A research team from King's College London believes that people with moles have stronger bones than normal, which makes them less likely to develop osteoporosis, The Times of India reports. Other suspected benefits include tauter muscles as well as healthier eyes and heart, according to the Daily Mail.
Woman loses case against osteoporosis drug company
11/24/2010 - A New York jury recently found that Merck & Company's osteoporosis drug Fosamax is not responsible for a Florida woman's dental and jaw problems, Bloomberg BusinessWeek reports.
Potassium citrate may be effective at treating and preventing osteoporosis
11/24/2010 - According to a new study, potassium citrate may be effective for preventing and treating osteoporosis, The Times of India reports.
Diabetes and depression more closely linked than thought
11/23/2010 - Researchers have long noticed a strong correlation between depression and type 2 diabetes, which has presented them with a classic chicken-and-egg scenario. Until recently, it has been difficult to determine which condition occurs first and causes the other, which makes it hard to address the root cause of either condition.
HIV treatments may contribute to type 2 diabetes
11/23/2010 - Early treatment with new generations of HIV medication has significantly extended the life expectancy and quality of live of individuals infected with the disease. However, a new study from Washington University researchers has found that these drugs may also increase the risk of insulin resistance, which could cause type 2 diabetes.
Researchers say taking a break from osteoporosis drugs may be beneficial
11/22/2010 - According to a study conducted at Loyola University Health System, taking time off from certain osteoporosis drugs may be beneficial to bone health. Researchers found that bone density remained stable for three years in patients who took a drug "holiday" from bisphosphonates - a popular class of osteoporosis drugs that can cause fractures in the thigh bones and tissue decay in the jaw bone.
Women with PCOS may also have thyroid disruption
11/22/2010 - The thyroid gland plays a vital role in the overall metabolism of the body. When thyroid function is impaired, liver function can be affected.
Study uncovers high price of childhood obesity
11/22/2010 - Children across the country are experiencing higher rates of obesity. This is having a damaging effect on their heart health and increasing their risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Diabetes during pregnancy may increase the risk of kidney-related birth defects
11/22/2010 - Expectant mothers who are obese or have type 2 diabetes are significantly more likely to have children with chronic kidney disease, according to a new study from University of Washington researchers.
Study shows low sodium levels may contribute to bone fractures in older adults
11/22/2010 - According to a study presented at the American Society of Nephrology's 43rd Annual Meeting and Scientific Exposition, older adults with mildly decreased levels of sodium in the blood, which is known as hyponatremia, can experience increased rates of fractures and falls.
Water ban in California raises questions about thyroid disrupting contaminates
11/22/2010 - Health officials recently lifted a ban on water use in half of Barstow, California, as the local utility continued to flush its system of perchlorate - a chemical used in rocket fuel and munitions that can lead to thyroid disruption - that authorities said may have contaminated the city water supply for months, the Los Angeles Times reports.
Scientists are testing potential hypothyroidism treatment
11/22/2010 - Hypothyroidism is a common endocrine condition. Individuals typically manage this disease through supplementation with synthetic thyroid hormone, in order to alleviate symptoms and restore normal thyroid stimulating hormone levels, 7th Space reports.
Fat outside the veins may contribute to poor heart health in diabetics
11/19/2010 - Fat outside the arteries may be one of the single most prominent factors that contribute to the development of heart disease in individuals with type 2 diabetes, according to new research from the University of Cincinnati.
BMI may be a poor measure of body fat
11/19/2010 - Body mass index - or BMI - is one of the most common measurements used by physicians to assess a patient's risk for developing type 2 diabetes. BMIs in the obese range have traditionally put an individual at significantly higher risk for developing the disease.
Changes in tissue molecules may contribute to osteoporosis risk
11/18/2010 - Scientists are reporting the first direct evidence that a subtle change in the physical properties of a tissue can affect its function. The finding could help in understanding several rare hearing disorders as well as offer insight into such conditions as osteoporosis, arthritis, cardiovascular disease and cancer.
Men may be at higher risk for complications related to osteoporosis fractures
11/18/2010 - When women hit menopause, their bone loss declines sharply. For men, the bone loss is much more gradual. However, doctors say if a man should suffer a fracture, the risk of complication is much worse, according to ABC news.
Study shows why people with anorexia are at higher risk for osteoporosis
11/18/2010 - Recent research reveals that people with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa have excess levels of fat in their bone marrow, which could explain why those with the condition lose bone mass and sometimes develop osteoporosis. The disorder, which affects mainly young women, leads to extremely low body weight and an obsessive fear of weight gain.
Report suggests total thyroidectomies are underused in child cancer patients
11/17/2010 - A new report published in the latest issue of Annals of Surgical Oncology indicates that although the proportion of young patients undergoing total thyroidectomy (TT) increased by 34 percent between 1985 and 2007, a variety of hospital and patient factors - including disparities in access to surgeons and state-of-the-art care - affect whether a child actually receives this procedure or another less extensive operation, NewsWise reports.
Organization plans study to test benefits of hormone
11/17/2010 - In an effort to help find a more effective treatment for individuals with type 1 diabetes, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation recently announced that it will fund an investigation into the effectiveness of a new hormone therapy.
Flax seed oil may reduce the risk of osteoporosis
11/17/2010 - Researchers at the National Research Center in Cairo, Egypt have released a statement saying that flax seed oil may help reduce the risk of osteoporosis or bone loss, The Brilliant Stories reports.
Researchers uncover enzyme that increases risk of type 2 diabetes
11/17/2010 - A team of researchers from the University of California have found an enzyme that plays a major role in processing fat. They believe that their findings could lead to the development of new drugs capable of significantly reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes and other obesity-related diseases.
Researchers are developing new osteoporosis treatment
11/17/2010 - Endocrinologists at the University of Pittsburgh (UP) are in the process of developing a treatment of osteoporosis using a naturally occurring hormone that promises to strengthen weakened bones, according to The Brilliant Stories.

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