Diabetes News and Research

As a patient, it’s so important to understand your condition. This is especially true for people with diabetes. Though diabetes has no known cure right now, you should be aware of the recent medical advances and discoveries as researchers work on finding a cure and improving treatments.

Having access to up-to-date news about diabetes research is one of the best ways to become an educated patient. That’s why we’ll update you with weekly research and treatment information, so that you can take the best care of your diabetes, whether it’s type 1, type 2, or gestational.

The goal is to make you an informed person who can talk with ease about diabetes, not just with relatives and friends but also with your doctor. The more you know, the more involved you can be in your healthcare decisions.

Uncovering process that determines fate of stem cells may lead to better treatments for type 1 diabetes
05/18/2011 - By looking at markers on proteins known as histones, around which DNA molecules wind, a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania believes that it may be possible to predict the fate of embryonic stem cells. This knowledge could be used to steer these cells toward developing into insulin-producing pancreatic cells, which individuals with type 1 diabetes lack.
Men with type 2 diabetes are more likely to suffer cardiovascular complications than women
05/18/2011 - Type 2 diabetes is known to increase an individual's risk of developing cardiovascular complications, but a new study from a group of Yale University researchers shows that men are at significantly greater risk than women.
Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is tied to increased risk of metabolic problems like obesity and type 2 diabetes
05/17/2011 - Gaining too much weight during pregnancy can dramatically increase a woman's odds of becoming obese later in life and developing associated health problems, which often include type 2 diabetes, according to a new study from a team of British researchers.
Enzyme may increase insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes risk
05/16/2011 - Higher levels of an enzyme known as PKC-delta may lead to greater insulin resistance and a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study from the Joslin Diabetes Center. Researchers said that their findings may lead to the development of new medications that improve insulin sensitivity.
Limiting cholesterol levels may minimize inflammation and reduce type 2 diabetes risk
05/16/2011 - By stimulating the enzyme CEH to remove more cholesterol from cells, it may be possible to limit inflammation, improve insulin sensitivity and reduce an individual's type 2 diabetes risk, said a group of researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine.
Researchers identify single gene that controls many risk factors for type 2 diabetes
05/15/2011 - A team of British researchers has found that the KLF14 gene, which was already known to play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol levels, may serve a much broader purpose in the body, regulating many metabolic functions.
New study finds link between growth hormone therapy and type 2 diabetes in children
05/12/2011 - In recent years, prescribing growth hormone has become a common treatment for many childhood conditions. However, a new study from the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly has found that this therapy may dramatically increase young people's risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Researchers identify genetic pathway involved in fat storage that may predispose individuals to type 2 diabetes
05/11/2011 - The discovery of a new genetic pathway that controls the storage of energy as fat and its subsequent expenditure could lead to the development of new medications aimed at treating metabolic conditions like obesity and type 2 diabetes, says a group of researchers from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.
Blocking a set of enzymes in the liver may turn off glucose production, leading to healthier blood sugar levels for type 2 diabetics
05/11/2011 - A new study from researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has shown that a group of enzymes known as histone deacetylases (HDACs) may play a key role in regulating the liver's production of glucose. The finding could lead to the development of new medications that allow individuals with type 2 diabetes to maintain tighter control over their blood sugar levels.
Researchers say type 2 diabetes may actually be an autoimmune disease
05/10/2011 - A new study from a group of Stanford University researchers suggests that, similar to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes may be an autoimmune disorder. The classification of the disease as such could drastically change the way that doctors and scientists think about it, which may lead to the development of different treatments and medications.
New study links reliance on car to obesity, with implications for type 2 diabetes
05/10/2011 - The surging obesity rates and the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes may be closely associated with Americans' growing reliance on automobiles, suggests a new study out of the University of Illinois.
Researchers seek to determine if combination of two type 1 diabetes medications will work
05/09/2011 - A new study on the possibility of combining injections of insulin and the blood sugar-mediating drug pramlintide could help individuals with type 1 diabetes limit the number of injections they need to take each day.
New study confirms benefits for type 2 diabetics of combining aerobic exercise and resistance training
05/09/2011 - When aerobic exercise is combined with resistance training, it can lead to significant improvements in cardiovascular risk factors among individuals with type 2 diabetes, according to a new study from a group of Canadian researchers.
Intervention Programs Help Women with Gestational Diabetes Lose More Weight
05/05/2011 - Lifestyle intervention programs that target diet and exercise habits may help women who experience gestational diabetes retain less weight during pregnancy and reduce their future risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study from the Kaiser Permanente Foundation.
Silencing a protein could turn fat cells into energy burners in individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes
05/04/2011 - Silencing the neuropeptide Y (NPY) protein in the brain may turn adipose tissue into a type of fat that burns excess energy rather than storing it, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins University researchers. The findings could have major implications for obese individuals who are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.
Late sleepers eat more calories and have higher BMIs, putting them at risk for type 2 diabetes
05/04/2011 - Individuals who regularly stay up late may be more likely to eat excess calories and have a higher body mass index (BMI), putting themselves at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, according to new research out of Northwestern University.
Physical activity leads to significant improvement in blood sugar control for type 2 diabetics
05/03/2011 - A structured exercise program, whether it includes aerobic workouts or resistance training, may help individuals with type 2 diabetes improve their blood sugar control, according to a new study from a team of Brazilian researchers.
Researchers discover why some type 2 diabetes medications cause weight gain
05/02/2011 - Thiazolidinedione (TZD) medications may be effective at lowering blood sugar levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes, but they have also been shown to cause significant weight gain. This can be a major health risk for individuals who are already more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease.
Current testing measures may miss many children at risk for type 2 diabetes
05/01/2011 - An early diagnosis of type 2 diabetes can play an important role in successfully treating the condition, but researchers from Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics have found that standard testing measures may be insufficient for diagnosing the condition in obese children.
New study shows it may be possible to turn pancreatic cells into insulin producers in people with type 1 diabetes
04/28/2011 - A team of researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) may have discovered a mechanism that could turn cells in the pancreas into insulin-producing beta cells, thereby eliminating the need to take insulin injections among individuals with type 1 diabetes.
Medical costs are higher for children with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes than healthy youths
04/27/2011 - Young people who have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes have significantly higher annual medical expenses than children who do not have the disease, according to a new study from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Vitamin D deficiency may be linked to type 2 diabetes risk in Caucasians, study finds
04/26/2011 - Vitamin D deficiency may contribute to racial differences in the way fat is stored in the body and increase the risk of type 2 diabetes among obese Caucasian children, according to a new study from a team of University of Pittsburgh researchers.
Researchers look at protein that may contribute to development of type 1 diabetes
04/24/2011 - Low levels of the protein interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) may predict an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes in children, according to a study currently being conducted by researchers at Georgia Health Sciences University.
New study describes molecular process that causes type 1 diabetes
04/21/2011 - A team of scientists from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research has identified a group of previously unknown immune system cells that may play a major role in the development of type 1 diabetes. The researchers believe that their findings could lead to the creation of new medications to suppress these cells and help individuals avoid the condition.
New medication may limit kidney damage in individuals with type 2 diabetes
04/21/2011 - A new medication developed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego may improve kidney function in individuals with type 2 diabetes and kidney disease, and help them avoid end-stage renal disease, according to a new study from the group.
 

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