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All Type 1 Diabetes Articles

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) and Hormone Health
Endocrine disrupting chemicals, or EDCs, are chemicals that act the same as, block, or change the way that natural hormones act in the body. Learn more about EDCs and how you can avoid exposure to these chemicals.
t:flex Large Capacity Insulin Pump for Diabetes is Available
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the t:flex™ insulin pump for marketing. The pump, manufactured by Tandem Diabetes Care, can store the largest amount of insulin (480 units) of any pump available in the United States.
Depression, Anxiety, and Eating Disorders Are Common in Teens and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes
Managing type 1 diabetes during the teenage years is challenging. Physical changes, social pressures, and stress can make it harder for teenagers and young adults to control their blood sugar levels.
Artificial Pancreas Is Being Tested for Overnight Use in Type 1 Diabetes
A big challenge for people with type 1 diabetes is managing blood sugar (or glucose) levels when they are asleep. Dips in blood sugar levels overnight may go unrecognized and can lead to serious consequences, including seizures and coma or, in rare cases, death.
Early Intensive Blood Sugar Control Lengthens Life in People with Type 1 Diabetes
Closely controlling blood sugar levels early in the treatment of type 1 diabetes was linked to a lower risk of death later in life, according to findings from a study that followed people with type 1 diabetes for approximately 27 years. The findings were published in the January 6 issue of JAMA.
What is Insulin?
Important hormone allows your body to use sugar (glucose)
Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that allows your body to use sugar (glucose) from carbohydrates in the food that you eat for energy or to store glucose for future use. Insulin helps keeps your blood sugar level from getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia).
Researchers identify molecular pathway that may become target of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes medications
There are many causes of both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Now, a team of researchers from Stanford University may have found a common treatment for both disorders.
Researchers find way to regrow insulin-producing beta cells
A team of researchers may have identified a molecule present in the body that stimulates the production of insulin-producing beta cells, which are lacking in individuals with type 1 diabetes, as well as developed a compound that protects this molecule.
Existing medication may reverse symptoms of type 1 diabetes
A medication that has long been used as a vaccination against tuberculosis and a treatment for bladder cancer may alleviate symptoms of type 1 diabetes, according to results from a clinical trial, which were presented recently at a meeting of the American Diabetes Association.
Young people with type 1 diabetes show signs of cardiovascular risk factors
Despite advancements in the treatment and care of individuals with type 1 diabetes, a new study out of Cincinnati Children's Hospital has found that young people with the condition are at a considerably higher risk of developing heart disease at a young age.
Life expectancy increases for individuals with type 1 diabetes
Individuals with type 1 diabetes are living longer than ever. In fact, the life expectancy of diabetics is increasing at rates faster than those seen in the general population, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Pittsburgh.
Researchers use genetic therapy to cure type 1 diabetes in mice
A team of Baylor College of Medicine researchers may have identified a genetic therapy that can stimulate the growth of new insulin-producing pancreatic cells and reverse the symptoms of type 1 diabetes, according to a recent presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Endocrine Society.
Researchers work to develop new artificial pancreas technology for use in type 1 diabetes treatments
A new artificial pancreas system being developed by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute could potentially save individuals with type 1 diabetes from the persistent demands of regularly checking blood sugar levels, its inventors said.
Uncovering process that determines fate of stem cells may lead to better treatments for type 1 diabetes
By looking at markers on proteins known as histones, around which DNA molecules wind, a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania believes that it may be possible to predict the fate of embryonic stem cells. This knowledge could be used to steer these cells toward developing into insulin-producing pancreatic cells, which individuals with type 1 diabetes lack.

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