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Low TSH, Normal T3 & T4's?

From: CloverGirl - 7 years 35 weeks ago

My TSH was 0.043, and my T3 & T4 tests returned 'normal'. What does that mean?

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Hi. I responded to your other message before I saw this one. If you go to the link that follows and scroll down the page there is a "Diagnosing Hyperthyroidism" flow chart. When my boyfriend and I were double checking the doctor's diagnosis we found the chart and the whole article pretty helpful. Looks like your test result put you on the unsure what it is leaf, but if you read the article there is more information.
http://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0815/p623.html

Good luck

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The TSH test is actually a pituitary gland function test. This test does not mean your thyroid is the issue.

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I know this is almost 7 years old, but did you ever find anything out? I've had two TSH tests done: first was .04 and second was .03. The free T4 test was normal (1.1 and 1.0). I was just curious if you had found anything out. I am scheduled for an uptake scan this week to evaluate further, as my antibody levels came back normal. Such an odd experience, simply put.

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rsherard3 - Did you ever find any answer to your issue? I have multinodular Goiter and nodules are getting bigger each year. I have had really low TSH but my Free T4 and Free T3 have been normal. I have been trying to get some answer for this for 15 years. When my TSH gets that low I can barley function. Nobody seems to have a good answer for why this is. Everyone says I must be "HypER" rather than "HyPO" however since the age of about 35 when this started I have steadily gained weight and my metabolism basically stands still. I never have any energy and it is hard to get motivated to do anything which is the opposite of how I used to be. As I get older the Brian fog gets works also. I had a Chiropractor tell me that I had three different types of Hypothyroidism including Hashimotos but conventional medicine does not indicate that because they only look at the blood work. One thing that is Always consistent is that my TSH is always LOW. So perhaps it is a pituitary issue but what could that be? Just curious if you found anything out about your situation? I had a Thyroid Uptake and scan a couple of years ago and that was another waste of money.

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I have the same issue! I saw one doc and I don't think he diagnosed me correctly. He said I have Hashimoto. I'm seeing a new doctor on Wednesday. Waited in line for months to see him as he is a leading guy here on the issue. I hope he will help. I'll post here.
Meanwhile, are you on any type of diet? I have another auto-immune condition and I was on a diet and that helped tremendously. Now I'm trying to figure out how to marry both of my diets (when I figure out what thyroid issue I have).

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I never got anything conclusive. They suspected my thyroid was overactive, but my uptake scan showed underactive. The doc said wait six weeks and come back. I waited six weeks, went back, labs came back normal, and they said, "you're all better!" I've had ups and downs since, but nothing like the case of the fatigue I had last year. I don't wish that feeling on anyone...

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Same with me. I was originally told to wait and observe. Went back and they said nothing to be done. Then it all went down. I'm not sure what it'll show tomorrow. I experienced fatigue before, but vitamin D-3 helped a lot. However, my level of energy is not what it used to be. I practice yoga (certified teacher) and I have to do a lot of physical exercise. With the fatigue, I'm not able to perform as I used to which affects me tremendously. I gained 20 lbs within the last 3 months despite my rigorous physical regimen and low-carb diet.
I do have another auto-immune condition that has no treatment. I am able to control is by my diet. I wonder if it's possible for thyroid issues.

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