Aspirin may help diabetics with kidney disease avoid heart complications

Heart disease is the most common cause of death for individuals who have type 2 diabetes. However, a new study from a team of Japanese researchers shows that low daily doses of aspirin may help reduce some this risk in patients who have both diabetes and kidney disease.

In particular, the Nara Medical University researchers reported in the journal Diabetes Care that aspirin can reduce a diabetic's chances of developing atherosclerosis, which is a hardening of the arteries that causes the heart to work harder, eventually causing it to wear out.

For the study, researchers gave a group of more than 2,500 participants who had type 2 diabetes and kidney disease either an 81 mg daily dose of aspirin, a 100 mg daily dose or no aspirin at all. The researchers then tracked the participants' medical records for nearly five years. During this time they checked for instances of stroke, heart disease and peripheral artery disease.



They found that individuals who were in either of the groups that received aspirin had significantly fewer atherosclerosis-related incidences than those who did not receive aspirin.



Based on the findings, the researchers said that there appears to be a strong relationship between diabetes-induced kidney disease and aspirin therapy. If future studies bear out these results, aspirin could provide a simple solution to a major problem that affects millions of people.

"The current study demonstrated that low-dose aspirin therapy reduced the risk of atherosclerotic events in type 2 diabetic patients," the researchers wrote in their report.

A previous study published in the journal Circulation showed that individuals with type 2 diabetes are at a significantly higher risk of developing atherosclerosis because persistently high levels of blood sugar in the veins causes inflammation that leads to a hardening of the arteries.
 
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