New guidelines help schools care for children with type 1 diabetes

In an effort to help the caregivers of children with type 1 diabetes keep these youths healthy, the National Diabetes Education Program, a division of the Department of Health and Human Services, has updated its manual on caring for diabetic children.

The guide, Helping the Student With Diabetes Succeed: A Guide for School Personnel, is intended to help parents and educators communicate and collaborate with one another to ensure that children with type 1 diabetes are receiving consistent, appropriate treatment. It also reflects the latest scientific research into caring for diabetic individuals.

Agency officials said that there can sometimes be a disconnect between the treatment that a child is receiving at home and at school. Sometimes parents don't even notify school personnel that their child has diabetes, which can lead to dangerous lapses in care.



"The need to manage diabetes doesn’t go away at school," said Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D., director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health."The guide, quite literally, can be a lifesaver."



In addition to providing strategies for caring for youths with type 1 diabetes, the guide also makes recommendations that are aimed at improving the experience of school children. For example, it says that all school staff, from the principal to bus drivers, should be trained in the needs of children with the condition and what to do if an emergency arises.

Guides like this are generally considered to play an important role in the care of children with type 1 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association has said that due to the fact that diabetes complications can strike at any hour of the day, schools need to be very involved in the lives of their diabetic students.
 
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