Amy  Hess-Fischl MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE's portrait

Amy Hess-Fischl MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE

Certified Diabetes Educator and Transitional Program Coordinator
Kovler Diabetes Center
Chicago, IL
Amy Hess-Fischl is a member of the EndocrineWeb Editorial Board.

About Amy Hess-Fischl MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE

Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE is a program coordinator for the Teen and Adolescent Diabetes Transition Program at the University of Chicago’s Kovler Diabetes Center. She is also a certified diabetes educator, nutrition specialist, and certified insulin pump trainer.

Her professional activities include writing CE test items for the American Association of Diabetes Educators, reviewing submissions for the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, and participating on the advisory boards of Nature’s Way, Dreamfields Pasta, and Jolly Time Popcorn.

She completed her undergraduate degree at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, IL. While earning her Master of Science degree from Mount Mary College in Milwaukee, WI, she researched the effect evening snacks have on blood sugars of patients with type 1 diabetes.

Publications

Hess AL, Seibert T. Insulin and Insulin Delivery Devices - Tools to Implement Intensive Treatment. Spring 2000. On The Cutting Edge. Diabetes Care and Education Practice Group. American Dietetic Association. Volume 21, Number 2.

Hess-Fischl A. Practical Management of Patient with Diabetes in Critical Care. April-June 2004. Critical Care Nursing Quarterly. Volume 27, Number 2. 189-200.

Evert A, Hess-Fischl A. Pediatric Nutrition Resources for the Patient and the Health Professional, American Dietetic Association 2005.

Power Foods to Combat Cancer Risk. Summer 1997 On Health (regional publication of St. James Hospital and Health Centers).

Here Comes the Sun! Healthy Eating During the Summer. Summer 1998 On Health.

Food For Thought: Back to School Basics for Active Youngsters. Fall 1998 On Health.

Herbs for Health. Winter 1998 On Health.

The Food Guide Pyramid for Young Children: Building Healthy Muscles, Bones, and Eating Habits. Winter 1999 On Health.

Simply Cooking. October 2002. Diabetes Self-Management.

Nutrition Resources on The Web. May 2003. Diabetes Self-Management.

 

Articles Written by Amy Hess-Fischl MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Issues Draft Recommendation Statement on Screening for Type 2 Diabetes
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has issued a draft recommendation regarding screening for abnormal blood glucose levels in all adults at increased risk for type 2 diabetes.
Up to 20% of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes May be Exercise Resistant
Studies suggest that up to 20% of people with type 2 diabetes may be exercise resistant—meaning that they do not see any improvement in glucose level when following a supervised exercise regimen, according to a systematic review.
Marked Cognitive and Memory Decline in People Who Develop Diabetes in Mid-life
People who develop diabetes in middle-age are more likely to experience significant memory and cognitive problems over the next 20 years compared to people without diabetes in midlife, according to a prospective cohort study.
Insulin-Related Hypoglycemia and Errors Lead to ED Visits and Hospitalizations Particularly in the Elderly
Insulin-related hypoglycemia and errors (IHEs) are significant causes of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations in insulin-treated people with diabetes.
Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms
The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually because it takes time for your body to develop insulin resistance. Learn more about symptoms in this article.
Classifications for Diabetes in Older Adults
The risk for diabetes increases with age, making diabetes common in older adults. In fact, approximately 25% of adults over the age of 60 years have diabetes. Learn how you can live better.
Type 2 Diabetes: Key Facts
Type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) is more common than type 1 diabetes. Around 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National 2014 Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the US population have diabetes. Learn about the basics.
Prediabetes
Being diagnosed with pre-diabetes doesn’t mean that you will definitely develop type 2 diabetes. Learn the treatment for pre-diabetes, and how lifestyle changes like eating better and getting exercise can help you avoid type 2.
What is Insulin?
Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that allows your body to use sugar (glucose) from carbohydrates in the food that you eat for energy or to store glucose for future use. Insulin helps keeps your blood sugar level from getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia).
Type 2 Diabetes and Insulin
If your type 2 diabetes symptoms can't be controlled with diet, exercise, and oral medications, you may wish to use insulin. Learn more about your options.
Meal Planning for Children with Type 1 Diabetes
When you have a child with type 1 diabetes, understanding carbohydrates is essential. In this article, you'll learn the importance of carb counting, and how fiber and sugar alcohols may also affect your child's blood glucose (blood sugar) levels.
Type 2 Diabetes Complications
With type 2 diabetes, you must control your blood glucose level if you want to avoid short- and long-term complications. Hypoglycemia, eye problems (retinopathy), nerve problems (neuropathy), kidney disease, and heart disease can all be prevented.
Type 2 Diabetes Causes
There are several causes of type 2 diabetes, including genetics and lifestyle choices. Developing type 2 is very dependent on how healthy you are: how well you eat and how physically fit you are. Learn what causes insulin resistance and type 2.
Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High
Hyperglycemia means the amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood is elevated beyond normal. It is a complication some people with diabetes experience. Learn the common symptoms and how to prevent hyperglycemia.
Type 2 Diabetes Facts and Tips
This list of facts and tips about type 2 diabetes provides a quick resource for you as you learn about and live with diabetes.

Articles Reviewed by Amy Hess-Fischl MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE

FDA Targets Trans Fats and Officially Bans PHOs from Foods
06/16/2015 - In a move that many health care practitioners consider long overdue, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today that partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs) pose too much of a health risk to be used as an ingredient in foods. Consumption of PHOs is linked to coronary heart disease and thousands of fatal heart attacks each year, according to the FDA.
Diabulimia: The Diabetes Eating Disorder
08/05/2015 - An eating disorder unique to people with type 1 diabetes called diabulimia, has become more prevalent in recent years and been gaining attention among experts, according to Lorraine Platka-Bird, PhD, RD, a diabetes educator who will be discussing the condition at the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Annual Meeting in New Orleans this week.
Type 2 Diabetes and Exercise
When you have type 2 diabetes, you must exercise. You probably heard that the day you were diagnosed. Learn what kinds of exercise to do and how to stick with an exercise plan so that you can better control of your diabetes.
Gestational Diabetes
During pregnancy, some women have high blood glucose levels; they have gestational diabetes. Learn if you’re at risk, how it can affect your baby, and how this type of diabetes is treated.
Type 2 Diabetes: How to Lose Weight
When they’re diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, people often hear that they have to lose weight. Weight loss can help you better control your blood glucose level. Learn other benefits of weight loss and how it can help you if you have diabetes.
Acetaminophen Can Falsely Elevate CGM Readings
08/21/2015 - A new study finds that acetaminophen may affect the accuracy of continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) more than was previously thought. 
Google + Dexcom = High-Tech, Low-Cost Diabetes Devices
08/13/2015 - Dexcom and the new Google Life Sciences company are teaming up to develop bandage-thin continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices. Google Life Sciences is one of the new companies that Google created under its restructured and newly named company, Alphabet.
Self-Monitoring Blood Sugar Improves Control in Those with Type 2 Diabetes Not On Insulin
08/06/2015 - People with type 2 diabetes who aren't on insulin can benefit from monitoring their own blood sugar, just as those on insulin can, according to new research presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Diabetes Educators.
Gestational Diabetes: A Risk Factor for Autism?
05/20/2015 - Women who develop gestational diabetes early in their pregnancy have a slightly higher risk of having a child diagnosed with autism, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Learn the best ways to manage diabetes if you're diagnosed during pregnancy.
Type 2 Diabetes Prevention
Article describes lifestyle changes, such as eating right and exercising, that can help you prevent type 2 diabetes.
Who should be tested for Diabetes, and how is Diabetes diagnosed?
Diabetes is diagnosed using one of four simple blood tests in a doctor’s office or health clinic. The tests measure your blood-glucose level, which means the amount of sugar in your blood. Many people with diabetes do not have symptoms so it is important to get tested if you have risk factors for the disease.
Boost Your Bone Health with Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements
To boost bone health, your doctor may recommend both calcium and Vitamin D supplements. Calcium, along with phosphorous, is one of the main minerals the body needs to create bone cells. The body also depends on calcium for a number of bodily functions — supporting the nerves, heart and other muscles in addition to some organs.
Sulfonylureas for Type 2 Diabetes
Sulfonylureas are a type of medications used to treat type 2 diabetes. They were the first drug developed to help people better control their blood glucose levels. Learn how sulfonylureas work and if they’re right for you.

Financial Disclosures for Amy Hess-Fischl MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE

EndocrineWeb, a Vertical Health, LLC website, is committed to ensuring that the medical information it presents is accurate, balanced, objective, and trustworthy.

To help achieve this goal, EndocrineWeb requires all authors, editors, and reviewers to disclose any financial relationships or affiliations they have with companies whose products or services may be mentioned in the content they author, edit, or review.

The intent of this policy is to identify any perceived, potential, or real conflicts of interest so that readers can make their own judgments about the value of information being presented.

Author's Statement

I, or an immediate family member, have a financial interest(s) or affiliation(s) with the following commercial companies whose products and / or services may be mentioned in the materials I have authored, edited or reviewed for presentation on Vertical Health, LLC’s websites.

Disclosed Relationships

Consultant
Roche Diabetes Care
Speakers' Bureau
Sanofi
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