Bridget  Brady MD, FACS's portrait

Bridget Brady MD, FACS

Director of Education Experience
University of Texas Dell Medical School
Austin, TX
Dr. Brady is a member of the EndocrineWeb Editorial Board.

About Bridget Brady MD, FACS

Dr. Bridget Brady is Director of Education Experience in endocrine surgery at Dell Medical School at the University of Texas/Austin. A fellowship-trained endocrine surgeon, Dr. Brady also serves as a clinical professor at Texas A&M Health Science Center’s College of Medicine’s Department of Surgery, and attending surgeon at the University Medical Center Brackenridge.

Dr. Brady’s areas of expertise include:

  • Thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal gland disease
  • Recurrent or persistent disease of the thyroid and parathyroid
  • Thyroid cancer
  • Ultrasound and Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) biopsy
  • Minimally invasive surgical techniques
  • Advanced laparoscopic surgical techniques

Education
Dr. Brady received her medical degree and graduated with honors from the University of Texas-Houston Medical School in Houston, TX. She completed a general surgery residency at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas. Dr. Brady continued her medical and surgical education by completing an endocrine surgery fellowship at the Philipps University Clinic in Marburg, Germany.

Associations
Dr. Brady is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons (FACS) and a member of many prestigious medical organizations, including the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, American Association of Endocrine Surgeons, Society of Baylor Surgeons, and Travis County Medical Society.

Contact Bridget Brady, MD

 

Publications

Publications and Presentations
Brady BM. Update on Primary Hyperparathyroidism. Grand Rounds Presentation. St. David's Medical Center, Austin, TX. April, 2014.

Brady BM. Endocrince Surgery Update. Grand Rounds Presentation. St. David's Medical Center, Austin, TX. February, 2009.

Brady BM. Parathyroid Perspectives: Recent Surgical Advances. Grand Rounds Presentation. St. David's Medical Center, Austin, TX. August, 2007.

Brady BM. Current Trends in Endocrine Surgery. Grand Rounds Presentation. Round Rock Medical Center, Seton Medical Center, South Austin Hospital. July, 2006.

Brady BM, Fant J, Jones RC, Grant MD, McCarty TM, Livingston SA, Kuhn JA. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Followed by Delayed Mastectomy and Reconstruction. American Journal of Surgery. 2005;189(2):251-252.

Nelson (Brady) BM, Kuhn JA, Arnold DT, Fisher TL, McCarty TM. Comparison of Retrocolic vs. Antecolic Roux-en-Y Limbs in Gastric Bypass. North Texas Chapter American College of Surgeons. February, 2004.

Nelson (Brady) BM. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy: Applications in General Surgery. Surgery Grand Rounds. Baylor University Medical Center, Houston, TX. July, 2003.

Brady BM, Smith BA. Bilateral Breast Cancer in a Patient with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome. Southwestern Surgical Congress. Poster. April, 2003.

Brady BM, Grant MD. Malignant Phyllodes Tumor in a Young Female: A Case Report. Southwestern Surgical Congress. Poster. April, 2003.

Brady BM, Smith BA. Bilateral Breast Cancer in a Patient with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome. North Texas Chapter American College of Surgeons. Poster. February, 2003.

Brady BM, Grant MD. Malignant Phyllodes Tumor in a Young Female: A Case Report. North Texas Chapter American College of Surgeons. Poster. February, 2003.

Brady BM, Fant J, Jones RC, Grant MD, McCarty TM, Livingston SA, Kuhn JA. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Followed by Delayed Mastectomy and Reconstruction. North Texas Chapter American College of Surgeons. Poster. February, 2002.

Brady BM, Fant J, Jones RC, Grant MD, McCarty TM, Livingston SA, Kuhn JA. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Followed by Delayed Mastectomy and Reconstruction. Southwestern Surgical Congress. Poster presentation. April, 2002.

Styperek KE, Kuhn JA, Grant MD, Andrews JA, McCarty TM, Knox SM, Newsome TW, Griffeth LK, Livingston SA, Brady BM, Stratmann SL, Jones RC. Phase II Results with Sentinel Lymphadenectomy for Breast Cancer Staging. North Texas Chapter American College of Surgeons. Oral Presentation "Best Oncology" Award. February, 2000.

Articles Written by Bridget Brady MD, FACS

Thyroid Cancer Treatments
To treat your thyroid cancer, your doctor will create a thyroid cancer treatment plan. Learn what may be in that plan, including thyroid surgery, radioactive iodine, and radiation therapy.
Thyroid Cancer Symptoms, Possible Causes, and Risk Factors
If you feel a lump or nodule in your neck, see a change in the size or shape of your neck, make an appointment with your doctor. Early detection of thyroid cancer is essential for a good treatment outcome.
Thyroid Cancer Follow-Up Care
After initial treatment for thyroid cancer, it is essential that you periodically follow-up with your doctor. Your doctor may recommend you receive a physical examination and full evaluation every 6 months or yearly.
Radioactive Iodine Therapy for Papillary or Follicular Thyroid Cancer
Radioactive iodine therapy (RAI), also known as radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA), is a treatment some patients with papillary or follicular thyroid cancer may receive after thyroidectomy. RAI or RRA is administered to destroy remaining (or remnant) thyroid cells after surgery.
Thyroid Cancer: Questions to Ask Your Doctor
The purpose of this article is to help you understand who may make up your treatment team and questions to ask to help you to make the best decisions about your medical care, or that of a loved one.
Thyroid Tumor Staging
After thyroid cancer is diagnosed, it is staged. “Staging” is a tool your doctor uses to classify characteristics about your malignant thyroid tumor. Staging the tumor helps your doctor determine the best treatment for your type of thyroid cancer.
Thyroid Cancer Diagnosis
Thyroid cancer diagnosis is a process of blood tests, lab tests, imaging tests (CT scans, for example), and a physical exam. Learn what your doctor will do in diagnosing thyroid cancer.
Incidence and Types of Thyroid Cancer
The National Cancer Institute indicates that thyroid cancer is the most common type of endocrine-related cancer and estimates 64,330 new cases in 2016. Thyroid cancer represents approximately 3.8% of all new cancer cases.
Pediatric Management of Thyroid Nodules and Cancer: Summary of the American Thyroid Association’s Guideline
The American Thyroid Association (ATA) Task Force on Pediatric Thyroid Cancer has released management guidelines for children with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer. Part 1 of this series describes the rationale for creating the pediatric guidelines and Parts 2 through 5 include a summary of the recommendations.
Pediatric Papillary Thyroid Cancer: ATA Recommendations 17-24
This is a summary of recommendations from the American Thyroid Association Task Force on Pediatric Thyroid Cancer on the management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer in children. Part 4 of this series includes a summary of recommendations 17-24.
Pediatric Papillary Thyroid Cancer: ATA Recommendations 9-16
This is a summary of recommendations from the American Thyroid Association Task Force on Pediatric Thyroid Cancer on the management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer in children. Part 3 of this series includes a summary of recommendations 9-16.
Pediatric Papillary Thyroid Cancer: ATA Recommendations 1-8
This is a summary of recommendations from the American Thyroid Association Task Force on Pediatric Thyroid Cancer on the management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer in children. Part 2 of this series includes a summary of recommendations 1-8.
Pediatric Papillary and Follicular Thyroid Cancer: ATA Recommendations 25-34
This is a summary of recommendations from the American Thyroid Association Task Force on Pediatric Thyroid Cancer on the management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer in children. Part 5 of this series includes a summary of recommendations 25-34.
Thyroid Gland, How it Functions, Symptoms of Hyperthyroidism and Hypothyroidism
The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ located in the base of your neck. It releases hormones that control your metabolism—the way your body uses energy. This article explains how the thyroid gland works, including the symptoms of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism.
Goiters: Abnormally Large Thyroid Glands
A goiter is an abnormally large thyroid gland. A goiter develops either because the whole gland is swollen or the gland has multiple growths or nodules on it. While some people with a goiter have no symptoms, others may have symptoms of an overactive or underactive thyroid.

Articles Reviewed by Bridget Brady MD, FACS

Common Thyroid Tumor Downgraded to Non-Cancerous
04/20/2016 - An international panel of pathologists and clinicians has decided to rename a type of thyroid tumor—until now deemed malignant—as non-cancerous.

Financial Disclosures for Bridget Brady MD, FACS

EndocrineWeb, a Vertical Health, LLC website, is committed to ensuring that the medical information it presents is accurate, balanced, objective, and trustworthy.

To help achieve this goal, EndocrineWeb requires all authors, editors, and reviewers to disclose any financial relationships or affiliations they have with companies whose products or services may be mentioned in the content they author, edit, or review.

The intent of this policy is to identify any perceived, potential, or real conflicts of interest so that readers can make their own judgments about the value of information being presented.

Author's Statement

I, the undersigned, declare that neither I nor members of my immediate family have a financial interests or affiliation with commercial companies whose products and / or services may be mentioned in the materials I have authored, edited or reviewed for presentation on Vertical Health, LLC’s websites.
There are no disclosures for this author
SHOW MAIN MENU
SHOW SUB MENU